Hiking Trails are plentiful in the park. With 15 miles of trails you will surely find a favorite. Maybe a short hike on the Indian House Trail to the rock overhangs used by the Indians for shelter, or a longer hike down to the lake for some awesome fishing on the Primitive Campground Trail; or up the mountain to the Point Rock Overlook where you could see a bald eagle flying and a spectacular view. All the trails hold a new adventure each time you visit.

Park Map (PDF)

Trail Highlights (PDF)

Point Rock Trail overview

Length: 2 miles - One way - not a loop.

Degree of difficulty:  moderate to easy.

This trail begins in the floor of Bucks Pocket Canyon and ends some 800 feet above the canyon floor on a sandstone formation called Point Rock. Natural features include Little Sauty Creek, varied plant life including wild flowers and ferns, and special geologic formations estimated to be between 200-250 million years old. The trail starts across the Little Sauty Bridge just outside the campground and terminates with a spectacular view of the canyon. 

Indian House Trail overview

Length: 1/2mile - One way - not a loop.

Degree of difficulty: Easy.

Historically, the Cherokee Indians frequently occupied the rock overhangs at the trails end. Wildflowers and rhododendrons are abundant along this trail and bloom early spring.

 

High Bluff Trail overview

Length: 1/2 mile - Oneway - not a loop.

Degree of difficulty: Easy to Moderate with some grade.

There is a huge beech tree in front of the overhang which is of historical significance. A small stream is located next to the overhang which flows during the fall and winter months.

 

South Sauty Creek Trail overview

Length: 2 1/2 miles - One way - not a loop.

Degree of difficulty: Moderate to Difficult; boots are recommended.

Natural features include two waterfalls ( which run in Fall/Winter), abundant plant life and a varied scenery. The trail starts just across the main creek bridge on the right.

 

Primitive Campground Trail overview

Length: 2 1/2 miles - One way - not a loop.

Degree of difficulty: Moderate; boots are recommended.

The Trail starts just before the main bridge headed down stream with the creek. The path is an old road bed leading to the lake. The trail offers a  beautiful view of the creek and boulders located in the creek bed. There is an abundance of plant life, animal life and a view of Lake Guntersville. The trail connects with a T.V.A. access road and continues for 3 more miles to Morgans Cove. This trail is an excellent area to view bald eagles in the winter months. 

 

Wildflowers and Waterfalls

 

Access to Alabama State Parks and State Park Programs is available without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex or disabilities.