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Press Release

Alligator Hunting the Focus of Next Conservation Q&A

May 08, 2012

Join the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries (WFF) for an hour-long web chat on Friday, May 18, 2012, at noon to have your wildlife and fishing questions answered. The focus of this chat will be the upcoming alligator hunting season, which begins in August. Visit www.outdooralabama.com/chat, between noon and 1 p.m., to join the chat on the day of the event. You can also send yourself an email reminder about the chat from the chat page any time before May 18.
 
WFF specialists in the fields of wildlife, fisheries, and conservation enforcement will also be available to answer your other wildlife, hunting, and fishing related questions live. As many questions as possible will be answered during the hour. The chat will be archived on the website so it can be read in its entirety following the event. To read the archived chats visit www.outdooralabama.com/chat/archive/.
 
Curious about alligators and can’t wait for the web chat? You can also watch last year’s Outdoor Alabama Live episode “Alligators and Snakes: What You Need to Know” on Outdoor Alabama’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/OutdoorAlabama.
 
The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources promotes wise stewardship, management and enjoyment of Alabama’s natural resources through five divisions:  Marine Police, Marine Resources, State Lands, State Parks, and Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries.  To learn more about ADCNR, visit www.outdooralabama.com .
 
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Photo (by Rick Dowling): The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is the largest reptile in North America. A fully mature alligator may grow to 14 feet in length and weigh as much as 1,000 pounds. In 1967, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service placed the American alligator on the Endangered Species list. By 1987, the species was removed from the list and the alligator population has continued to grow.