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Press Release

Eight Arrested for Illegal Dumping in Tuscaloosa County

March 16, 2005

Conservation Officers recently made eight cases of illegal dumping in Tuscaloosa County within a two-day period. Lt. Clifton A. Robinson and Sergeant Todd Draper of the Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries investigated and made the arrests.

The dump is located in the Woodstock/Green Pond area of Tuscaloosa. The site was known to the officers and they were watching it for activity. They caught the first violator after only 15 minutes. “Sgt. Draper had made several cases at this location, so we knew that people were actively dumping trash there,” said Lt. Robinson.

The two officers caught five people littering the first day of the stakeout and two the following day. They also found a name and address in the trash, which they investigated. They subsequently obtained a confession from the person and an arrest warrant was issued.

In addition to the littering cases, several incidental cases were made: one driving while license was revoked; one driving without a license; one open alcohol container; and two trespass warnings. One of the littering suspects was taken directly to jail because he had 10 warrants from three different counties.

Illegal dumps are not only unsightly, they also are potential fire and health hazards. Lt. Robinson says that he makes illegal littering arrests in connection with routine game and fish cases, but this was the largest number of cases at one time that he has ever been associated with. “Many law enforcement agencies regularly make arrests for illegal littering,” he said, but Conservation officers are in a unique position because we often patrol wooded areas and have vehicles that are able to get off the main roads.”

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